Voter Information

To be eligible to vote:

  1. You must be a Canadian Citizen 
  2. You must be at least 18 years of age on election day 
  3. You must be a resident of the Municipality OR be a registered owner of a property for at least six months prior to election day. (Since April 26, 2022) 

Voter's List Information


Frequently Asked Qustions


There are two types of voters that are qualified to vote in a municipal election and a Local Urban District committee election.
  1. Resident Voters: In order to qualify as a resident voter, a person must be:
    • A Canadian citizen;
    • At least 18 years of age on Election Day; and
    • A resident of the local authority or Local Urban District for at least six months on Election Day.
  2. Persons with no fixed address may vote in a municipal election. If the person has no ordinary or "fixed" residence in the local authority, they are deemed to reside at the shelter, hostel or other similar institution that most frequently provides lodging, food or other social services.

  3. Non-resident Voters: In order to qualify as a non-resident voter, a person must be:

    • A Canadian citizen;
    • At least 18 years of age on Election Day; and
    • A registered owner of land in the municipality or Local Urban District for at least six months on Election Day.
  4. For municipal election purposes, "registered owner of land" means:

    1. a tenant or occupier of the land, if his or her name is entered on the latest revised realty assessment roll as the owner of a right, interest or estate in it; or
    2. if no person qualifies under clause (a), the person who is the owner of a freehold estate in the land, including a person who is owner with another person, as joint tenants, or tenants in common of a freehold estate OR a person who is registered under The Condominium Act as the owner, defined in that Act, of a unit under that Act.
  5. If there are more than two non-resident property owners for a single property, a maximum of two can vote in a municipal election. In order to vote, each voter must obtain written consent from the majority of the registered property owners, and file this with the Senior Election Official.

    In the case of ward elections, a voter must vote in the ward where they reside, even if they own property in more than one ward. If a property owner does not reside in the municipality, but owns property in more than one ward, the person must apply to the Senior Election Official to designate their voting ward. The voter must choose a ward before the voters list is closed to revisions, or the Senior Election Official will choose a ward on the voter's behalf.
If you are a resident of Manitoba, own property in the municipality, and are otherwise qualified to vote, you may be able to vote in the municipal election as a non-resident property owner.
 
If you own property with other non-resident property owners, only two of you can vote. You must obtain written consent from the majority of the other property owners and file this with the Senior Election Official in order to vote.
A qualified resident voter's name must be placed on the voters list for the ward in which he or she resides. A person must be a resident of the municipality for at least 6 months before Election Day to qualify as a resident voter - there is no term of residency requirement to vote in a ward. As long as a person qualifies as a registered voter in the municipality, that person also qualifies to vote in the ward in which they reside on Election Day.
 
If you move from one ward to another within your municipality, contact your SEO to ensure that your name is included on the voter’s list correctly. The SEO may update the voters list until the close of nominations on September 20, 2022.

LUD committee members are elected by the voters of the LUD. To qualify as a voter of the LUD, a person must be a Canadian citizen, at least 18 years of age, and either a resident of the LUD or a registered owner of land in the LUD for at least six months before Election Day.

No, for school division elections, you must be a resident of the school division to be eligible to vote. Non-resident property voters may only vote in municipal elections.

No, you may only vote once in an election within a municipality. If you live in one ward and own property in another ward, you must vote in the ward where you reside.

No, you may only vote once in an election within a municipality. If you own property in two wards, you must notify the Senior Election Official of the ward where you would like to vote. If you do not choose a ward at least six weeks before Election Day, the Senior Election Official will choose one for you.  

Yes, if you are qualified as a resident voter in one municipality, and are qualified as a non-resident property owner in another municipality, you can vote in both municipal elections.

No, the owners of a corporation or a company do not quality to vote in a municipal election as non-resident owners. Unless you are a resident of the municipality, your property must be registered in your name and not in the name of a corporation before you qualify to vote.

Persons residing within a First Nations reserve are not residents of any municipality, and are therefore not qualified to vote in a municipal election. First Nations reserves are excluded from municipal boundaries, as set out in the Municipal Status and Boundaries Regulation (567/88 R). However, if you reside on a First Nations reserve, but own property in a municipality, you are entitled to vote as a non-resident property owner.

If a voter wishes to have their information obscured from the voters’ list, they may file an application with the SEO in person, by mail or by fax. After receiving the application, the SEO must give the applicant a personal security certificate that includes an identification number to be used as a replacement for the person's name and address. A person who is given a personal security certificate may only vote by sealed envelope ballot.

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